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Travel Notes: Oct. 27, 2013

By Staff reports

Pipestem camping change

PIPESTEM, W.Va. -- Pipestem Resort State Park's new camping reservation policy begins Nov. 1. Reservations for campsites will be accepted online, by telephone or by mail one year in advance from the first day of each month, according to Paul Redford, district administrator for West Virginia State Parks.

"It's more camper-friendly," Redford said. "Today's RVer and tent camper wants the security of a reserved site, particularly at Pipestem."

To reserve online, follow the prompts on the "Online Reservation" tab at www.pipestemresort.com. Lodge rooms and cabin rentals also can be made using the online service. For more information, call 304-466-1800.

Dancing at Stonewall

ROANOKE, W.Va. -- Stonewall Resort welcomes back WV Dance Inc. for a ballroom and Latin dance weekend Nov. 22-24.

The weekend begins with evening lessons in rumba for both beginner and intermediate dancers and will be followed by a dance party featuring all different forms of both Latin and ballroom dances. On Nov. 23, activities include beginner and intermediate dance lessons in nightclub two-step and ballad and an evening dance.

There is no dress code for the weekend, but guests are encouraged to wear shoes with either a leather or suede sole to facilitate ease of movement.

The weekend package costs $349.99 per couple (plus tax and resort fee) and includes all dance instruction, overnight lodging on the Friday and Saturday nights and breakfast on the Saturday and Sunday mornings. The dance activities are not designed for people who come without a dance partner.

For more information and to make reservations, contact the resort at 888-278-8150 or www.stonewallresort.com.

Lewisburg film festival

LEWISBURG, W.Va. -- The Wild and Scenic Film Festival will take place beginning at 7 p.m. Nov. 4 in the historic Lewis Theatre.

The nationally touring festival of outdoor and conservation films and documentaries is sponsored by the West Virginia Wilderness Coalition, along with local sponsors such as Serenity Now Outfitters, Elk River Touring Center and Hill and Holler Bicycle Works.

A pre-party will take place at 5 p.m. Nov. 3 at Hill and Holler Bicycle Works in downtown Lewisburg. Complimentary refreshments will be served and Hell for Certain String Band will perform.

Tickets are $15 for the film festival and a suggested $10 donation for the pre-party, or attendees can buy a $20 pass for admission to both the film festival and the pre-party. Advance tickets can be purchased online via PayPal at www.wvwild.org/festival.html.

More information about the Wild and Scenic Festival is available at www.wildandscenicfilmfestival.org. For more information about the Lewisburg installment of the festival or the West Virginia Wilderness Coalition, visit www.wvwild.org.

Flatpicking legend

MARLINTON, W.Va. -- Larry Keel and Natural Bridge will play at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Pocahontas County Opera House, 818 Third Ave.

Keel is described by some reviewers as the most powerful, innovative and all-out exhilarating acoustic flatpicking guitarist performing today. He has released 14 albums and is featured on 10 others.

Opera House doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $8. Children 17 and younger will be admitted free of charge. Tickets are available in advance via www.pocahontasoperahouse.org.

From Appalachia to Italy

FAIRMONT, W.Va. -- The Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center at Fairmont State University is sponsoring a two-week study and travel abroad program called "Roads to Appalachia Through the Mezzogiorno."

In collaboration with the Calabria-West Virginia Heritage Association, the trip is planned for June 20 through July 3 to the southern Italy regions of Campania, Calabria and Sicily. Arrangements are made by National Travel of West Virginia. The experience will focus on the unique heritage similarities between Appalachia and southern Italy. Participation is open to the public.

"Many Italian West Virginians can trace their cultural roots through ancestors who were part of the massive migration of labor force needed to fuel the Industrial Revolution in America at the beginning of the 20th century," said Dr. Judy P. Byers, director of the Folklife Center.

"As outlined in the itinerary, travelers will experience the contrasts of regional landscapes, architecture, works of art and folklore, as well as exploring famous cities, visiting small villages and forests, eating wonderful food, seeing historical monuments and buildings and meeting artisans."

To view an itinerary and detailed cost information and to obtain an application for the trip, visit www.fairmontstate.edu/folklife.


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